Natural Sciences

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Number of Programs: 10

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  • Arthropod Research Collection (ARC)

    Location:

    401 Natural Sciences Building, 288 Farm Lane, East Lansing, MI, 48824

    Description:

    The ARC collection contains adult and immature insects, spiders, ticks, mites, and other arthropods, as well as nematodes, primarily from Michigan and the Great Lakes region. The Collection also contains many specimens from other parts of the world. The Center provides a reference collection of authoritatively identified specimens for research and extension; loans specimens worldwide for research; conducts systematics, evolutionary, and biodiversity research; collaborates and assists in faculty and graduate student research; and maintains a repository of voucher specimens documenting research.

  • Berry Crop Entomology Information and Resources

    Description:

    The Isaacs Lab studies the biology and management of insects in berry crops. Members of the lab are currently working on pest phenology, pheromone mating disruption, pollination, biological control, and selective insecticide evaluations, all with insects found in berry crops. Their extension program provides growers with practical information to make decisions about insect management, to improve their productivity, profit, and environmental safety.

    Pollination is critical for production of most berry crops, and we are investigating the ecology and management of pollinators and their economic value. We are also exploring the interactions between landscape structure and beneficial insects, both natural enemies and pollinators, in Michigan farmland.

  • Center for Advancing Microbial Risk Assessment

    Location:

    301 Manly Miles Building, 1405 S. Harrison Rd, MSU, East Lansing, MI, 48823.

    Description:

    The Center for Advancing Microbial Risk Assessment (CAMRA) provides the tools needed to combat bioterrorism and ward off global outbreaks of infectious diseases. Along with a consortium of scientists from six other universities, MSU's Joan Rose and other MSU scientists will use the center to help shape policy and create a global strategy for dealing with these microbial risks.

  • Center for Global Change and Earth Observations

    Location:

    218 Manly Miles Building, 1405 S. Harrison Road, East Lansing, MI, 48823

    Description:

    The overarching goal of CGCEO is to contribute to the understanding of the interrelations among human, land, and climate systems in an international context, as reflected in MSU’s Boldness by Design. Building on existing strength in interdisciplinary approaches to understand the social processes, land use and land cover patterns and processes, and environmental impacts and responses at regional to global scales, the Center addresses the following key science questions:

    How are social processes altering and impacting global environmental dynamics? How do these changes, in turn, respond to and affect land and human systems?

    The research activities at the Center attempt to identify, understand and model land surface processes; determine and quantify socioeconomic root causes of and responses to global change, and assess human/animal health and ecosystem services.

  • Genomics, Flow Cytometry, Bioinformatics, Proteomics, Mass Spectrometry, and IVIS Imaging Services

    Location:

    S-18 Plant Biology Building, MSU, East Lansing, MI, 48824.

    Description:

    The Research Technology Support Facility (RTSF) at Michigan State University is supported and managed by the Office of the Vice President for Research and Graduate Studies.

    • Bioinformatics Core: The Bioinformatics Core has staff specialists who assist in the computational analysis and presentation of Genomic, Proteomic and other complex datasets.
    • Flow Cytometry Core: The Flow Cytometry Core offers two flow cytometers to the MSU community. Both are multiple laser based optical instruments that analyze cell populations for multiple characteristics simultaneously.
    • Genomics Core: The Genomics Core provides single gene to genomic scale DNA sequencing services, DNA fingerprinting and genotyping, quantitative PCR, microarray printing and analysis. 
    • IVIS Spectrum Imaging Core: New to RTSF is the IVIS Spectrum Imaging Core for quantitative bioluminescent and fluorescent (transmission and reflectance) imaging in vivo and in vitro.
    • Mass Spectrometry Core: The Mass Spectrometry Core uses an array of mass spectral techniques for small molecule identification as well as analyses and for Metabolomic profiling.
    • Proteomics Core: The Proteomics Core offers high-throughput mass spectral protein identification and determination of protein expression patterns.
  • JINA's (Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics) Visitors Program

    Location:

    National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, 640 South Shaw Lane, East Lansing, Mi  48824

    Description:

    JINA's Visitors Program is open to interested scholars, researchers, and students to come and participate in research at Michigan State University, Arizona State University, University of Notre Dame, or the University of Washington. Collaboration between experimentalists, theorists, and observationalists is a key goal of the institute and our visitor program facilitates such interaction.

  • Mass Spectrometry Facility and Services

    Location:

    Room 11, Biochemistry Building (in basement), 603 Wilson Rd, East Lansing, MI, 48824.

    Description:

    The RTSF Mass Spectrometry and Metabolomics Core is an ‘open access’ resource where MSU researchers and Core staff perform chemical analyses for small molecules and intact macromolecules.  Analyses performed here typically involve compound identification, quantification, and statistical analysis.  Methods currently running include nontarget metabolite profiling (metabolomics) and high-throughput profiling and quantification of amino acids, phytohormones, nucleotides signaling oxylipins, structural lipids, and central and specialized metabolites. Capabilities for MALDI-TOF tissue and surface imaging have also been developed. The Core performs analyses of samples from more than 100 institutions from across North America.

  • National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory

    Location:

    1 Cyclotron, 640 S. Shaw Lane, East Lansing, MI, 48824.

    Description:

    MSU's National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) is a national user facility devoted to basic research in nuclear science as well as accelerator and instrumentation research and development. Historically, the NSCL has played a key role in the scientific and technical education of a large number of young scientists and engineers in undergraduate, graduate, and postdoctoral programs. The NSCL plays an important role in pre-college and community education with programs such as a summer intern program for middle and high school teachers and guided tours of the facility to interested groups. The NSCL also has a number of research activities including research of nuclear structure and reactions; nuclear astrophysics; the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) Project; and accelerator design and beam physics.

  • Research Technology Support Facilities and Services

    Description:

    The Research Technology Support Facility (RTSF) is a collection of five analytical facilities which provide the fundamental tools for modern life science research. RTSF core facilities include: Bioinformatics core; Flow cytometry core; Genomics core; Imaging-IVIS core; Mass spectrometry and metabolomics core; and proteomics core.

     

  • South Campus Field Research Facilities

    Location:

    The station’s 2,739 acres of farmland and forest are located south of Mt. Hope Road on MSU’s south campus.

    Description:

    There are 18 research facilities located on the south campus of MSU that allow AgBioResearch scientists to perform research in the areas of animal science and production, plant production and protection, environment and natural resources management, and renewable energy. State-of-the-art facilities and 2,739 acres of farmland and forest allow scientists to perform research close to campus and allow growers to view a number of demonstration plots in one visit to the university.

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