Environment

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Number of Programs: 3

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  • Bettinghaus Lecture on Climate Change (April 2017)

    Dates:

    April 21, 2017.  3:00 pm

    Location:

    Communication Arts and Sciences Building, Room 145, 404 Wilson Road, East Lansing, MI  48824

    Description:

    Dr. Edward Maibach will be presenting at the College of Communication Arts and Sciences’ annual Bettinghaus Lecture.  Dr. Maibach is the Director of George Mason University’s Center on Climate Change Communication. His lecture will be based off of his research on practicing collaboration with TV weathercasters, “Climate Matters.”

  • Dessert with Discussion: Invasives vs. Natives: Plant Species Race Against Climate Change (October 2017)

    Dates:

    October 9, 2017.  7:00 pm - 8:30 pm.

    Location:

    Kellogg Biological Station - Auditorium, 3700 E. Gull Lake Drive, Hickory Corners, MI 49060

    Description:

    Dr. Jen Lau, MSU Associate Professor W. K. Kellogg Biological Station and Department of Plant Biology, will discuss:

    • Humans are changing the earth in many ways, including warming the planet and spreading invasive species.
    • These human-caused changes pose challenges to native species.  Or Native plants are challenged by invasive species and human-caused changes.
    • How do we tip the balance to favor and preserve native species?

    Enjoy coffee, tea and delicious locally sourced desserts provided by the KBS Conference Center. A cash bar featuring house wines and Michigan craft beer available prior to the event.

  • Michigan Conservation Stewards Program (2017 - 2018)

    Location:

    Please see locations and dates of upcoming programs at the website indicated below.

    Description:

    CSP participants learn about the history of conservation activities in Michigan, ecological principles, ecoregional classifications, and how to make choices to manage our natural resources. In addition to this foundation, participants learn about terrestrial ecosystems (forestlands and grasslands) and aquatic ecosystems (wetlands, lakes and streams) through classroom and in-field instruction.

    Becoming a conservation steward involves the completion of the following: 1. Classroom and field-based training led by experts in various fields of conservation and natural resources, including lectures, interactive learning and field experiences; 2. Self-paced online learning modules provided via Michigan State University’s Desire2Learn (D2L) course management interface which participants will complete on their own; and 3. Volunteer service including the completion of an in-class Capstone Project related to an area of interest as well as additional community volunteer service related to restoring and conserving Michigan’s ecosystems.

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