Environment

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Number of Programs: 6

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  • Kellogg Bird Sanctuary Tours

    Location:

    12685 East C Ave, Augusta, MI, 49012. (15 north of Kalamazoo and 12 miles NW of Battle Creek, MI).

    Description:

    The Kellogg Bird Sanctuary offers guided educational tours to school groups. The tours provide knowledge about preserving and protecting natural habitats that we share with wildlife. The Kellogg Bird Sanctuary remains an innovator in wildlife conservation efforts. The sanctuary also has a pollinator and rain garden and a large picnic area. Visitors can browse and purchase items at our Resource Center and Giftshop featuring nature-related gift items and books. Very low admission fees apply.

  • Long-Term Ecological Research

    Location:

    3700 East Gull Lake Drive, Hickory Corners, MI 49060.

    Description:

    The Kellogg Biological Station Long-term Ecological Research (LTER) Program studies the ecology of intensive field crop ecosystems and its environmental consequences as part of a National Network of LTER Sites established by the National Science Foundation in 1980. The KBS LTER joined the network in 1988. LTER research at KBS is designed to answer the broader question of how agronomic management can better utilize biological resources in cropping systems to control pests, provide nitrogen, and build soil fertility: In short, how to make agriculture more profitable and provide environmental benefits.

    Our main research areas include agronomy, microbial ecology, plant dynamics, insect dynamics, biogeochemistry, regionalization, ecosystem services, and biofuels. Our experimental systems range from field plots to landscapes. We study the ecology of major field crop ecosystems – annual crops such as corn, soybean, and wheat, perennial crops such as alfalfa, and biofuel crops such as switchgrass and poplars. We also study the natural, unmanaged ecosystems that occur in agricultural landscapes, such as forests and old fields.

  • Michigan Conservation Stewards Program (2018)

    Location:

    Please see locations and dates of upcoming programs at the website indicated below.

    Description:

    CSP participants learn about the history of conservation activities in Michigan, ecological principles, ecoregional classifications, and how to make choices to manage our natural resources. In addition to this foundation, participants learn about terrestrial ecosystems (forestlands and grasslands) and aquatic ecosystems (wetlands, lakes and streams) through classroom and in-field instruction.

    Becoming a conservation steward involves the completion of the following: 1. Classroom and field-based training led by experts in various fields of conservation and natural resources, including lectures, interactive learning and field experiences; 2. Self-paced online learning modules provided via Michigan State University’s Desire2Learn (D2L) course management interface which participants will complete on their own; and 3. Volunteer service including the completion of an in-class Capstone Project related to an area of interest as well as additional community volunteer service related to restoring and conserving Michigan’s ecosystems.

  • Michigan Water School: Essential Resources for Local Officials (May 2018)

    Dates:

    May 22 - 23, 2018.  8:30 am - 5:00 pm

    Location:

    Western Michigan University, Innovation Event Center, 4717 Campus Drive, Kalamazoo, MI

    Description:

    This workshop will investigate:

    • Factors that impact Michigan water
    • The Blue Economy
    • Fiscal benefits of water management
    • Incorporating water into local planning and placemaking
    • Risk assessment approaches
    • Resources to help address water problems
    • Water policy at the federal, tribal, state, and local levels
  • W. K. Kellogg Experimental Forest (Augusta, MI)

    Location:

    7060 N. 42nd Street, Augusta, MI 49012

    Description:

    Established on abandoned agricultural land, the 716-acre Kellogg Experimental Forest is known worldwide for research on tree breeding and genetics, planting techniques, and plantation establishment and management. Much of the research that developed the Spartan spruce, a hybrid that combines the color and drought resistance of a blue spruce and the softer needles and rapid growth rate of the white spruce, was done at the Kellogg Forest. The forest is open to the public for biking, hiking, horseback riding and cross-country skiing, and also has several interpretive trails.

  • W.K. Kellogg Biological Station Tours, Events, and Resources (Hickory Corners, MI)

    Location:

    3700 East Gull Lake Dr, Hickory Corners, MI, 49060.

    Description:

    MSU's Kellogg Biological Station (KBS) is one of North America's premier inland field stations. Located between Battle Creek and Kalamazoo, KBS is known for its contributions to ecological science and evolutionary biology. KBS's mission is to develop programs in research, education, and extension directed toward a comprehensive understanding of natural and managed ecosystems and the conservation of natural resources. KBS is a field site for ecological research not only because of its excellent facilities but also because of the exceptional diversity of field research sites that are readily accessible from the station. Much of the habitat and species diversity that characterize the upper Midwest can be found in the local area. KBS provides educational tours of the Manor House, Bird Sanctuary and Kellogg Farm, as well as many events and workshops for K-12 educators, students, and the general public.

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